Sunday Music & Bach & Ich Habe Genug

Johann Sebastian Bach’s aria “Ich habe genug.” Soprano Carolyn Sampson performs with the Bach Collegium Japan, directed by Masaaki Suzuki (2008). Embedding is disabled but worth a watch directly on the T’oobs. This seems to be the prettiest version out there.

Ich habe genug,
Ich habe den Heiland, das Hoffen der Frommen,
Auf meine begierigen Arme genommen;
Ich habe genug!
Ich hab ihn erblickt,
Mein Glaube hat Jesum ans Herze gedrückt;
Nun wünsch ich, noch heute mit Freuden
Von hinnen zu scheiden.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I have enough,
I have taken the Savior, the hope of the righteous,
into my eager arms;
I have enough!
I have beheld Him,
my faith has pressed Jesus to my heart;
now I wish, even today with joy
to depart from here.

Mahler & Symphony 2 & Movement 3 & Berio & Sinfonia & Movement 3

From Gustav Mahler’s Symphony no. 2 (“Resurrection”), the third movement. Georg Solti conducts the London Symphony Orchestra (1966). This is one of my favorite movements, in one of my favorite symphonies. Sound advisory: Do be advised of abrupt volume changes.

And now, as a follow up, one of the wildest, craziest pieces of music I know. Here, Luciano Berio uses Mahler’s third movement as the ambient background for the third movement of his own Sinfonia (1968-69). He creates a mind-blowing sound collage using overlaying voices (with snatches of text, mostly from Claude Lévi-Strauss and Samuel Beckett) and musical fragments that include Stravinski, Ravel, Beethoven and György Ligeti (whose music appeared in sequences of Kubrick’s 2001). Pierre Boulez conducts the Orchestre National de France, with Ward Swingle and the New Swingle Singers (1969). I find the effect kind of dreamlike. Judge for yourself!

Easter Music Special & Zappa & Mahler

Kind of an Easter tradition around here.

First, Zappa’s extended guitar piece “Watermelon in Easter Hay,” originally from Joe’s Garage Act III (1979). This live recording is from 1988.

Next, most of the choral segment from the finale of Gustav Mahler’s “Resurrection” Symphony (no. 2). Myung-Whun Chung conducts the Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra (2010). Chorus and soloists unknown.

This segment of the text is by Mahler himself.

O glaube, mein Herz, o glaube:
Es geht dir nichts verloren!
Dein ist, ja dein, was du gesehnt!
Dein, was du geliebt,
Was du gestritten!

O glaube
Du wardst nicht umsonst geboren!
Hast nicht umsonst gelebt, gelitten!

Was entstanden ist
Das muß vergehen!
Was vergangen, auferstehen!
Hör’ auf zu beben!
Bereite dich zu leben!

O Schmerz! Du Alldurchdringer!
Dir bin ich entrungen!
O Tod! Du Allbezwinger!
Nun bist du bezwungen!

Mit Flügeln, die ich mir errungen,
In heißem Liebesstreben,
Werd’ich entschweben
Zum Licht, zu dem kein Aug’ gedrungen!

Sterben werd’ ich, um zu leben!
Aufersteh’n, ja aufersteh’n
wirst du, mein Herz, in einem Nu!
Was du geschlagen
zu Gott wird es dich tragen!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

O believe, my heart, O believe:
Nothing to you is lost!
Yours is, yes yours, is what you desired
Yours, what you have loved
What you have fought for!

O believe,
You were not born for nothing!
Have not for nothing, lived, suffered!

What was created
Must perish,
What perished, rise again!
Cease from trembling!
Prepare yourself to live!

O Pain, You piercer of all things,
From you, I have been wrested!
O Death, You masterer of all things,
Now, are you conquered!

With wings which I have won for myself,
In love’s fierce striving,
I shall soar upwards
To the light which no eye has penetrated!

Die shall I in order to live.
Rise again, yes, rise again,
Will you, my heart, in an instant!
That for which you suffered,
To God will it lead you!

Holy Week Music & Ligeti & Kyrie

As we approach Holy Week our music will the Kyrie from György Ligeti’s Requiem (1963-65). It is not easy listening. We are continuing with our Stanley Kubrick related sacred music thing. This Ligeti piece (but it’s not the only Ligeti piece) is prominent in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Respect to Youtuber MegaMark211 for the visual presentation, which takes us from Good Friday (which will be April 3) to Easter Sunday (April 5).

I know it doesn’t sound like it, but there really are words to this song.

Kyrie eleison
Christe eleison
Kyrie eleison

Lord have mercy
Christ have mercy
Lord have mercy

Henry Purcell & Thou Knowest & Funeral March & Lenten Music

Music for the Funeral of Queen Mary, by Henry Purcell (1659-1695): “Thou Knowest, Lord” and Funeral March.

The March is famously in the soundtrack of Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange. (Sunday music that is in the movies of Kubrick is getting to be a thing around here.) Choir of Clare College Cambridge directed by Timothy Brown, and the Baroque Brass of London.

Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts;
shut not thy merciful ears unto our pray’rs;
but spare us, Lord most holy, O God most mighty.
O holy and most merciful Saviour,
thou most worthy Judge eternal,
suffer us not, at our last hour,
for any pains of death, to fall away from thee.

Jaco Revisited & Punk Jazz

From Jaco Pastorius Big Band: Word of Mouth Revisited, a Jaco Pastorius tribute album (2003) that has been featured earlier. There are no bad cuts on this album, at all.

Richard Bona channels Jaco on bass, with Mike Scaglione soloing on tenor sax, and Mark Griffith on Drums. Music by Jaco Pastorius, with orchestration and arrangement by Larry Warrilow and Peter Graves. Woodwinds: Billy Ross, Ed Calle, Gary Keller, Mike Brignola. Brass: Jeff Kievett, Jason Gardner, Ken Faulk Dana Teboe, John Kricker. Peter Graves directs.