Posted on

Ue o Muite Arukou & Kyu Sakamoto

The famous “Sukiyaki Song” (1963) that has nothing to do with sukiyaki!

Ue o muite arukoo
(I look up when I walk)
Namida ga kobore nai yoo ni
(So the tears won’t fall)
Omoidasu haru no hi
(Remembering those happy spring days)
Hitoribotchi no yoru
(But tonight I’m all alone)
Ue o muite arukoo
(I look up when I walk)
Nijinda hoshi o kazoete
(Counting the stars with tearful eyes)
Omoidasu natsu no hi
(Remembering those happy summer days)
Hitoribotchi no yoru
(But tonight I’m all alone)
Shiawase wa kumo no ue ni
(Happiness lies beyond the clouds)
Shiawase wa sora no ue ni
(Happiness lies above the sky)
Ue o muite arukoo
(I look up when I walk)
Namida ga kobore nai yoo ni
(So the tears won’t fall)
Nakinagara aruku
(Though my heart is filled with sorrow)
Hitoribotchi no yoru
(For tonight I’m all alone)
(whistling)
Omoidasu aki no hi
(Remembering those happy autumn days)
Hitoribotchi no yoru
(But tonight I’m all alone)
Kanashimi wa hoshi no kage ni
(Sadness hides in the shadow of the stars)
Kanashimi wa tsuki no kage ni
(Sadness lurks in the shadow of the moon)
Ue o muite arukoo
(I look up when I walk)
Namida ga kobore nai yoo ni
(So the tears won’t fall)
Nakinagara aruku
(Though my heart is filled with sorrow)
Hitoribotchi no yoru
(For tonight I’m all alone)

Words by Rokusuke Ei
Music by Hachidai Nakamura

Advertisements

5 responses to “Ue o Muite Arukou & Kyu Sakamoto

  1. Liz

    oh so sad! and such a bouncy tune! whistling only belongs in happy songs. ?? Why sukiyaki? And just how famous is it?

    • wdydfae

      You might like these tributes to the earthquake and tsunami victims using this song. Suntory put it together using the vocal talents of singers and actors.

      • Liz

        that is nice! love that you’re putting me in touch with another part of the world. Seems those who live in America are often woefully sheltered from global goings-on.

  2. wdydfae

    According to our trusty Wikipedia:

    “The title Sukiyaki, a Japanese hot pot dish, actually has nothing to do with the lyrics or the meaning of the song; the word served the purpose only because it was short, catchy, recognizably Japanese, and more familiar to most English speakers. A Newsweek Magazine columnist noted that the re-titling was like issuing ‘Moon River’ in Japan under the title ‘Beef Stew.'”

    And:

    “The song reached the top of the Billboard Hot 100 charts in the United States in 1963, and remains to date the only Japanese-language song ever to have done so. In addition, it was and still is one of the few non-Indo-European languages’ songs to have reached the top of the US charts.

    “It is one of the best-selling singles of all time, having sold over 13 million copies worldwide.[1][2] The original Kyu Sakamoto recording also went to number eighteen on the R&B chart.[3] In addition, the single spent five weeks at number one on the Middle of the Road charts.[4] The recording was originally released in Japan by Toshiba in 1961. It topped the Popular Music Selling Record chart in the Japanese magazine Music Life for three months, and was ranked as the number one song of 1961 in Japan.”

  3. Liz

    ‘k–so when you say “famous” you mean “famous.” I missed this by a chunk of years as I am a child of the ’70s. Appreciate feeling not so old as there seem to be so many of the younger generations here in the blogosphere. It’s up to us “old folks”–haha–to keep it real 😉

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s