Sunday Music & Jimi Hendix & Gary Moore & RIP Zippy

This is not part of my normal routine here as a default music blogger, but I’d like to dedicate this post to the memory of blogger Zippy Catholic (real name Matthew F.), who was lost in a traffic accident. He’s had an immense influence on me, though I didn’t know him in real life. He was frighteningly smart and spiritually hard-core.

Prayers for Matthew, who has been in my daily Rosary, and condolences to his family.

There is a musical connection. Zippy actually visited this blog once, and we had an exchange on, of all things, moral theology and Jimi Hendrix. (Apparently Zippy loved him some rock guitar, especially metal.)

Oddly, days before I heard the terrible news, I had dug up my Electic Ladyland CD (which I hadn’t listened to it in a very, very long time) and I had chosen it for my commuting music. I was grooving pretty intensely on both versions of “Voodoo Chile” for two days.

To honor Zippy’s theological proposition about rock-n-roll, I revisit the T’Oob that he contributed to WDYDFAE on the thread above, “Red House,” a Hendrix tribute performed by Gary Moore.

Rock on, Zippy.

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Sunday Photos Hibaku Maria

img_3464A fierce persecution of Christians in Japan began in the late 1500s and continued for several decades, ending in the virtual eradication of Christianity. But there were “hidden Christians” in Kyushu, concentrated especially in the area around Nagasaki and the setting for Martin Scorcese’s new movie Silence (based on the novel by Shusaku Endo). The “hidden Christian” practiced their faith in secret for generations. Even after Japan opened up to the world, the hidden Christians could not gain religious freedom until the late 1800s.

Urakami Cathedral was built in 1914 in the village of Urakami, next to the booming port and industrial center of Nagasaki. It was the testament of the “hidden Christians” of Urakami who could finally practice their faith openly. Formally it was called Immaculate Conception Cathedral (and still is). It was for a time the largest church in Asia. A wooden statue of Mary of the Immaculate Conception was set above the main altar.
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Urakami Cathedral was a few hundred yards from ground zero of the atomic bomb which was dropped on Nagasaki about three decades later. The burned and severed head of Mary of the Immaculate Conception was miraculously found in the rubble. It is now enshrined in the rebuilt Urakami Cathedral and known as “Hibaku Maria,” or “Bombed Mary.”

Consecration Day 32 & Evans and Hall & 600th Post


“Romain,” from Undercurrent (1962). Bill Evans (piano), Jim Hall (guitar).

32nd day of Consecration preparation, 6th day of the 12th month of the 15th year of the millennium, and the 600th post on this blog. It all has to mean something, I’m just not sure what . . .

Consecration text here. Video here:

Consecration Day 30 & Miles Davis Quintet & All Blues


“All Blues,” from My Funny Valentine, live performance at Lincoln Center (1964), New York City. Miles Davis (trumpet), George Coleman (sax), Herbie Hancock (piano), Ron Carter (bass), Tony Williams (drums).

Text for Consecration here. Video here:

Consecration Day 28 & Ravel & Quartet & First Movement


Maurice Ravel, String Quartet in F major (1903), first movement (Allegro moderato — Très doux). The Fine Arts Quartet (1986). Ralph Evans and Efim Boico, violins; Wolfgang Laufer, cello; Jerry Horner, viola.

Day 28 Consecration text here. Video here: